Cultural Beliefs and Health Behavior

An analysis of the article by Chavez, McMullin, Mishra and Hubbell (2001) that argues that cultural beliefs affect our health behavior.

The paper reviews the article by Chavez, McMullin, Mishra and Hubbell that presents the results of a study conducted to investigate the extent to which cultural beliefs affect health behavior. The paper discusses the conclusion that structural factors, in conjunction with cultural beliefs, account for health behavior. The paper considers implications of this article and asserts that they are extremely pertinent for contemporary trends in global health.
“The article by Chavez, McMullin, Mishra and Hubbell (2001) presents the results of a study conducted to investigate the research question: to what extent do cultural beliefs affect health behavior? The health issue in the study was cervical cancer risk factors and the use of Pap exams. The main findings were that cultural consonance did not significantly affect Hispanic women’s use of Pap exams. Instead, this behavior was influenced by structural factors such as medical insurance, education and language acculturation. In cases where Latinas’ cultural beliefs corresponded with those of Anglo women, they usually had a Pap exam within the previous two years; when beliefs corresponded with physicians’ beliefs, Latinas were far less likely to have had a recent exam. The conclusion reached was that structural factors, in conjunction with cultural beliefs, account for health behavior.”
writing service contract template

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *